Aug,26th
1 ♥ - Reblog
Anonymous
who were marilyn's drama coaches/where did she take acting classes?

No hello/goodbye/thank you/ please/i like your blog/i like you/ i want to be you/i want to wear your skin…. too far too far. 

Um she had a few different ones (from Adam Victor’s book):
*1947-49: The Actors Lab (Phoebe Brand and Morris Carnovsky)
*1948-1955: Natasha Lytess
*1951-53: Michael Chekhov
*1953: Lotte Goslar
*1955: Constance Collier
*1955-1961: The Actors Studio (Lee Strasberg, Paula Strasberg) 
as well as dozens of voice coaches, singing teachers and choreographers.  




Aug,22nd
156 ♥ - Reblog
 Marilyn’s “vital statistics” as they were once called, naturally varied over the years. They also changed depending on who was giving out the numbers.
    In 1945, when she signed up to the Blue Book Modeling Agency, Norma Jean declared:

     height: 5’55’
     weight: 118 pounds
     measurements: 36-24-34, size 12  (My note: sizes in the 40s were different than now, the general rule is to divide by 2 but like now sizes varied from store to store)
    hair color: medium blonde, “too curly to manage, recommend     bleach and permanent”
    eyes: blue and “perfect teeth”

  In her first national feature in a 1951 issue of Collier’s magazine, starlet Marilyn ws billed as 37-23-34.
   In her earliers studio biographies Marilyn’s height is up by half an inch to 5’5 1/2, and, inexplicably, her date of birth was brought forwards to 1928. Twentieth Century-Fox initially quoted her measurements at 36 1/2-23-34, but by 1955 she was advertised as 38-23-36, a set of measurements corroborated by Marilyn’s costume designer, William Travilla.
    When filming Let’s Make Love (1960), Marilyn was a voluptuous size 16, and weighed around 140 lbs. Much has been written on the difference between the curvy Marilyn and today’s waif models, but it should be remembered that because of changes to the way the clothing sizes are calculated, a 16 in the fifties is equivalent to a size 12 (sometimes said to be 8) today. Marilyn took a U.S. size 7AA in shoes. 
    Even Marilyn’s famous quip about using her measurements as her epitaph comes in different versions: it’s either ‘Here lies Marilyn Monroe, 37-22-35’ or ‘Here lies Marilyn Monroe, 38-23-36.”

-Adam Victor, ‘The Marilyn Encyclopedia



Aug,22nd
13 ♥ - Reblog
Anonymous
Do you know Marilyn's measurements?(:

It depends on who you listen to, also her measurements changed through the years. She’d lost weight, she gained weight (during her pregnancies). From Adam Victor’s The Marilyn Encyclopedia:
 

    Marilyn’s “vital statistics” as they were once called, naturally varied over the years. They also changed depending on who was giving out the numbers.
    In 1945, when she signed up to the Blue Book Modeling Agency, Norma Jean declared:

     height: 5’55’
     weight: 118 pounds
     measurements: 36-24-34, size 12  (My note: sizes in the 40s were different than now, the general rule is to divide by 2 but like now sizes varied from store to store)
    hair color: medium blonde, “too curly to manage, recommend      bleach and permanent”
    eyes: blue and “perfect teeth”

  In her first national feature in a 1951 issue of Collier’s magazine, starlet Marilyn ws billed as 37-23-34.
   In her earliers studio biographies Marilyn’s height is up by half an inch to 5’5 1/2, and, inexplicably, her date of birth was brought forwards to 1928. Twentieth Century-Fox initially quoted her measurements at 36 1/2-23-34, but by 1955 she was advertised as 38-23-36, a set of measurements corroborated by Marilyn’s costume designer, William Travilla.
    When filming Let’s Make Love (1960), Marilyn was a voluptuous size 16 (refer to above note), and weighed around 140 lbs. Much has been written on the difference between the curvy Marilyn and today’s waif models, but it should be remembered that because of changes to the way the clothing sizes are calculated, a 16 in the fifties is equivalent to a size 12 (sometimes said to be 8) today. Marilyn took a U.S. size 7AA in shoes. 
    Even Marilyn’s famous quip about using her measurements as her epitaph comes in different versions: it’s either ‘Here lies Marilyn Monroe, 37-22-35’ or ‘Here lies Marilyn Monroe, 38-23-36.”
 



Aug,20th
99 ♥ - Reblog
via 

elsiesmarina:

Marilyn’s Diet - Part 3 of 3

When she lived in New York during the mid-fifties, Amy Greene recalled that Marilyn was constantly on and off diets. When she was off, she did things like eat hot dogs purchased from a street vendor with Arthur Miller as he showed her around town. Marilyn also enjoyed eating caviar - big pots of caviar - washed down with champagne. During 1957 and 1958 Montgomery Clift used to come to her apartment for caviar and vodka. He never brought olives - Marilyn couldn’t stand them.

Few memoirs about Marilyn have anything good to say about her cooking. First husband James Dougherty complained of the colourful but tasteless peas and carrots placed in front of him, and interviews where she talked about cooking, Marilyn made it clear that she was more experimental than accomplished in the kitchen.

In 1960, when working on Let’s Make Love, Marilyn and Arthur Miller generally dined with next door neighbours Yves Montand and Simone Signoret after shooting. They took turns cooking wholesome fare such as spaghetti or lamb stew.

- The Marilyn Encyclopedia by Adam Victor




Aug,20th
137 ♥ - Reblog
via 

elsiesmarina:

Marilyn’s Diet - Part 2 of 3

In a 1953 interview, Marilyn talked about the demands fame had made on her diet: “I’ve turned anemic since all this happened - I have to drink raw liver juice and stir uncooked eggs into my milk. And I eat steak for breakfast every morning.”

This sort of menu is not too different from some of today’s high protein weight loss diets. But Marilyn’s preferred method of (temporary) weight reduction was in fact colonic irrigation, which she reputedly practiced on a regular basis.

Marilyn tended to eat plenty of proteins (meat and eggs), some greens, and as few carbohydrates as possible. For most of her adult life she ate irregularly: in the periods when she was taking drugs her appetite and eating habits were disturbed. Until her 1961 gallbladder operation, Marilyn suffered acute and recurring digestive problems.

The Marilyn Encyclopedia by Adam Victor




Aug,20th
222 ♥ - Reblog
via 

elsiesmarina:

Marilyn’s Diet - Part 1 of 3

As a child, Norma Jeane’s love for all living creatures meant that she wouldn’t eat fish, and she had a hard time eating chicken. She once told a photographer on location for Niagara that if she saw a chicken leg she would imagine the whole animal, and that would spoil the whole meal for her.

In the struggling starlet years she didn’t have the money to eat properly. In 1948 she told Fred Karger, “I have grapefruit and coffee for breakfast, and cottage cheese for lunch. Some days I get by with just a little over a dollar a day for food.” As work began to pick up, she would have a kick-start morning drink of orange juice fortified with gelatin. There are stories that all she could afford in the worst of this period was peanut butter and raw hamburger (not necessarily together). When she lived with Natasha Lytess, every day she would breakfast on cold oatmeal porridge with milk, and then eat two eggs, washed down with orange juice and gelatin.

Marilyn was a very big steak fan, enjoying them on special occasions such as birthdays and for her wedding dinner with Joe DiMaggio. He and his family introduced her to the delights of Italian cooking: Mama DiMaggio taught her how to make a spaghetti sauce to satisfy her Italian-American husband’s appetite.

- The Marilyn Encyclopedia by Adam Victor




May,27th
207 ♥ - Reblog

Films Marilyn Considered or Wanted: Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Audrey Hepburn was nominated for a best actress Oscar in 1961, but it could have been Marilyn. Truman Capote, who wrote the original novel, wanted Marilyn to play Holly Golightly, but Paramount preferred Hepburn in the Blake Edwards move. Producer Martin Jurow has said that Marilyn was sounded out and appeared to be very interested before Paula Strasberg advised her against playing a lady of dubious virtue.



Mar,16th
121 ♥ - Reblog

To paraphrase Winston Churchill’s characterization of the Germans, the press with Marilyn Monroe was either at her feet or at her throat.
-Arthur Miller




Mar,16th
40 ♥ - Reblog

Adam Victor’s “The Marilyn Encyclopedia”: Press [Part 6]

    Biographers unfailingly note that Marilyn never used the press to air personal grievances. She was always polite about her ex-husbands, and refused to be drawn into manufactured studio rivalries with other stars.
     Particularly in the later part of her career, when she was not protected by a  studio publicity department, sections of the press ran barbed snipes at Marilyn for alleged errors she had made, Simone Signoret writes that during the time they lived next door to one another at the Beverly Hills Hotel in 1960, snide pieces documented alleged gaffes at fancy restaurants, despite the fact that Marilyn seldom went out to eat, and when she did, she was in her Marilyn mode and would play the role that was expected of her.
    For the reported, the Marilyn beed was not the easiest. Columnist Erskine Johnson revealed his own experience in print:

       ” Waiting for Marilyn” I’ll never forget, and I doubt if Hollywood ever will. People may admire Marilyn Monroe, envy Marilyn Monroe, dislike Marilyn Monroe but, most of all, people wait for Marilyn Monroe.
         Once I waited for Marilyn in Phoenix. A visit to the set and a chat with her on location for ‘Bus Stop’ had been arranged. I waited all day and Marilyn never came out of her dressing room. Another newsman, who had more time, waited in Phoenix for Marilyn for five days and she never came out of her hotel room. Or invited him in.




Mar,16th
49 ♥ - Reblog

Adam Victor’s “The Marilyn Encyclopedia”: Press [Part 5]

    Press interest in Marilyn during her time in England that year also was frenzied. If she and Arthur went out to the theater, which they did on numerous occasions, they were blocked by crowds of pressmen until police could clear a path. Miller writes that most of what was printed in British papers during their stay was fictitious,conversations invented by editors. One day, however, a  conversations they had had in the privacy of their own home was repeated almost verbatim in a daily newspaper. The leak was traced back to the Hungarian servants: they were reprimanded by a British security operative, ex-policeman Roger Hunt, who acted as Marilyn’s bodyguard in England, and threatened the servants with immediate repatriation to Budapest if it ever happened again.
     Journalists and photographers lay in wait every morning from 8 A.M. outside the Millers’ Sutton Place apartment. One morning when Marilyn attempted to leave home incognito, the press pursued her out of the service entrance and took photos of her among the garbage cans.




Mar,16th
17 ♥ - Reblog

Adam Victor’s “The Marilyn Encyclopedia”: Press [Part 4]

     Marilyn’s secret flight to New York in late 1954 set off a frenzied press hunt to track her down. Life on the East Coast brought at least partial respite from presshounds, and Marilyn even managed to get to known future husband Arthur Miller away from prying lenses and columnist sources. But when she returned to Hollywood in early 1956 to shoot Bus Stop, despite the best intentions of business partner Milton Greene to keep all press and newsmen off the set, he couldn’t prevent photographers from using the longest lenses they could muster.
     When, in her private life, Marilyn did make concessions to the press, it didn’t always work to her benefit. Press conferences she held to announce the formation of her own company, Marilyn Monroe Productions, and official press notification about the company’s first movie, The Prince and the Showgirl (1957), brought a barrage of unfriendly fire from journalists who belittled what they regarded as her pretensions.
    As press speculation reached a fevered pitch regarding the impending marriage between Marilyn and Arthur Miller, the couple arranged a press conference at their Roxbury home, attended by up to 400 journalists. Earlier that day Paris-Match reporter Mara Scherbatoff was killed in a car accident as she pursued Miller’s car down narrow country lanes- an incident that left Marilyn shocked on her wedding day.



Mar,16th
33 ♥ - Reblog

Adam Victor’s “The Marilyn Encyclopedia”: Press [Part 3]

    By this time the Fox publicity department had finessed the more “uncomfortable”  aspects of Marilyn’s past. Hence in her official studio biographers Marilyn became an orphan (eliciting greater sympathy than a mother in a mental institution), and the number of foster parents increased at every telling-at one point reaching fourteen.
     To give an idea of how famous Marilyn was at her most famous: in 1952 Marilyn merited as many column inches (including photos) as the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in London, or the engagement of high society political couple Senator John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier.
     The flip side to all this media attention was the almost total absence of privacy. Marilyn’s romance with Joe DiMaggio was often a slalom between copy-hungry hacks. In November 1954 it was impossible for Marilyn to emerge from the Cedars of Lebanon Hospital, where she had had surgery, because the press besieged the building.



Mar,16th
63 ♥ - Reblog

Adam Victor’s “The Marilyn Encyclopedia”: Press [Part 2]

     On June 27, 1949 the story that started the avalanche of press coverage appeared in the New York Daily Mirror when Sidney Fields wrote, “Marilyn is a very lovely and relatively unknown movie actress. But giver her time; you will hear from her.” A month later Marilyn gave her first interview to Earl Wilson.
     At the outset, Marilyn’s contacts with the press were rigorously developed and massaged by the studio publicity department at Twentieth Century-Fox, led by publicist-in-chief Harry Brand. When Marilyn won a degree of independence from the studios in the mid-fifties, she had her own publicists to arrange and vet interviews. But Marilyn quickly developed the skills required to turn the press to her best advantage. She found and cultivated press allies, and became a recognized master in the art of “the plant.” Her main confederate in these endeavors was columnist Sidney Skolsky, whom she first met in the late forties. Skolsky not only gave Marilyn favorable coverage in his own column, he helped her draft articles that were published under her name (such as a 1952 series of articles entitled “Wolves I have Known” as told to columnist Florabel Muir), advised her on how to combat negative publicity, and became the second person to publish a Marilyn biography. Another reliable ally was columnist Louella Parsons, who came to Marilyn’s assistance in 1953 when she was attacked by Joan Crawford for her display at the Photoplay awards.



Mar,16th
73 ♥ - Reblog

Adam Victor’s “The Marilyn Encyclopedia”: Press [Part 1]

    Although we tend to think of press intrusion in the lives of the famous as a modern-day phenomenon, Marilyn was one of a long line of huge stars whose every move was stalked by men with cameras. Pieces in the press were important to make her a star, but once she was there, the paparazzi became an intrusion. Nevertheless, on many occasions Marilyn used her newsworthiness to push her own agenda.
    Marilyn’s first press exposure came in 1946, in the form of a judiciously planted item that appeared in Hedda Hopper’s syndicated column. Mentions outside of trade publications and cheesecake magazines were few and far between for the next three years, though Marilyn did curry some favor with local Hollywood journalists, winning the 1948 “Miss Press Club" title at the Los  Angeles Press Club.



Mar,13th
79 ♥ - Reblog

Films Marilyn Considered or Wanted: Guys and Dolls

    This MGM version of a Broadway smash hit came out in 1955, not long after Marilyn told columnist Earl Wilson that the role she most wanted was the one Vivian Blaine had played onstage in the Broadway adaptation of Damon Runyon’s short stories about colourful, loveable New York lowlifes. The lavish production starred two of Marilyn’s favourite actors, Marlon Brando and Frank Sinatra, alongside Vivian Blaine and Jean Simmons. It was written and directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz and photographed by Harry Stradling.