Sep,18th
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Marilyn with Rupert Allan during the Golden Globe awards at the Coconut Grove in the Ambassador Hotel, LA, 1960.




Sep,18th
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Marilyn on the set of ‘There’s No Business Like Show Business’ with Donald O’Connor and vocal coach Ken Darby, 1954.




Sep,17th
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Marilyn at the St. Jude Hospital Foundation charity benefit with the Ames Brothers at the Hollywood Bowl, 1953.




Sep,17th
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Sep,16th
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Marilyn in Korea, 1954.




Sep,16th
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Marilyn photographed by Philippe Halsman.




Sep,16th
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Bus Stop (1956)




Sep,16th
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Sep,16th
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Favorite Films: Don’t Bother to Knock (1952)




Sep,16th
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asterhodes
hi! i just want to say your blog is awesome! i like MM, but then i found here Louis de Funes and Adriano Celentano and Vladimir Vysotsky and i just like awww so many beauty!!

Haha thank you! It’s the result of being raised by Soviet parents.




Sep,15th
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Marilyn with operative cameraman Fred Bently on the set of ‘Clash by Night.’




Sep,15th
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Sep,14th
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Sep,14th
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Marilyn and Tom Ewell in a deleted scene from ‘The Seven Year Itch’




Sep,14th
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Vladimir Vysotsky [25 January 1938- 25 July 1980] was a Soviet bard; singer-songwriter, poet and actor whose short career had an immense and enduring influence on Soviet and Russian culture.  His popularity as an actor (his rendition of Hamlet was a widely acclaimed) was exceeded by his talent as a songwriter- singer.  He was known for his unique voice and lyrics which were filled with social, political, and satirical commentary. He had written over 800 songs which about the war, about Soviet prison life, about Soviet official hypocrisy, as well as about ordinary Soviet life, basically about everyone and everything. From his songs people drew the strength to live, to love, to work.  His popularity was not derived from mass-production record labels, but rather through home-made reel-to-reel audio tape recordings. Only one official record was released during his lifetime. Despite continuously bumping heads with the Soviet government, Vysotsky’s talent and popularity made it easier for him to get away things (such as traveling to France without permission, performing worldwide). During Vystosky’s lifetime, Soviet television did not broadcast any of his performances or interviews. But like most creative geniuses, Vysotsky was battling his inner demons with alcohol and later on with drugs. He attempted to get clean but the withdrawal got the better of him. During the night of July 24-25th, Vysotsky suffered a myocardial infarction. No official announcement of his death were announced apart from a brief obituary in a Moscow newspaper. Despite this the news spread fast, and on July 28 a mourning ceremony involving an unorganized mass gathering of unprecedented scale took place.  During the time of his death, the Olympics took place in Moscow, the attendance dropped significantly as tens of thousands of people lined the streets to see him one last time. He was laid to rest at the Vagankovo Cemetery. [xxx]  

He embodied all that is Russian. He was Russia,” said Vasily Ovchinnikov.